News and Events

Two Habitat for Humanity homebuyers will soon get keys to a new life

Habitat for Humanity of Montgomery County (HFHMCTN) will hold dedication ceremonies for two new homes at 304 Reynolds St. and 1318 Cedar St. in Clarksville on Sunday, March 10, 2019.

The local affiliate of Habitat for Humanity International partners with low income families, volunteers and builders to provide decent, affordable housing to those who do not qualify for a conventional home loan.

“Dedicating a home and handing off the keys to a new homeowner is the reason behind everything we do at Habitat and it’s only possible in a caring community,” HFHMCTN President Kevin Underwood said.

The Messiah Sadler and Sonya McAdoo families completed 250 work hours (which Habitat calls ‘sweat equity’) and attended required classes in home maintenance, finances and related topics.

Like all partner families, the Sadlers and McAdoos also demonstrated they can pay back the 0% interest loan provided by Habitat for Humanity.

The McAdoo home at 304 Reynolds St. in Clarksville will be dedicated on Sunday, March 10.

State Representative Jason Hodges, whose District 67 includes Clarksville, said by involving homeowners in every step of the process, Habitat for Humanity is a model for how communities can help address the housing crisis in Tennessee. “We have so many families that need help getting into affordable housing and there’s no better program than this one to accomplish that,” Hodges said.

“Those serving behind the scenes are critical to selecting qualified families to teach them how to be good homeowners and how to take a step forward in life, so it really is a team environment and a true partnership within our community,” Clarksville attorney and Habitat Board Member Paige Barbeauld said of the program.

It is a core belief of Habitat for Humanity that decent shelter helps build strong, stable communities and strengthens families to live independently.

Habitat for Humanity MCTN has been serving low-income families in the Clarksville-Montgomery County community since 1992.

DOES HABITAT FOR HUMANITY GIVE AWAY HOUSES?

No. We believe in giving community members a hand up, not a hand out. We do this by partnering with families who are in need, are willing to provide sweat equity, and have the ability to repay a zero-interest mortgage. Typically, their total annual income is less than half the area median income.

IS JIMMY CARTER THE FOUNDER OF HABITAT FOR HUMANITY?

No. Habitat for Humanity was started in 1976 in Americus, GA by the late Millard Fuller and his wife Linda. President Carter and his wife Rosalynn (whose home is in nearby Plains, GA), have been longtime Habitat supporters and volunteers who help bring national attention to the organization’s house-building work.

HOW DOES HABITAT PROVIDE FOR FAMILIES IN NEED?

Partners such as volunteers, donors and sponsors are imperative in our work to eliminate substandard housing in our community. Donors and sponsors provide the funds to buy needed materials and tools. Volunteers provide labor, which helps us keep costs down — and hopes up.

WHAT IS A PARTNER FAMILY?

Those who are recommended by our Family Selection Committee and approved by our Board of Directors to participate in our homeowner program.

WHAT IS SWEAT EQUITY?

Sweat equity is volunteer work. Partner families are responsible for sweat equity hours, on construction or repair of the partner family’s house and/or the houses of others, providing food for volunteers, working in the Habitat ReStore or Habitat office, and attending homeownership classes.

HOW CAN I BECOME INVOLVED WITH HABITAT FOR HUMANITY?

Habitat for Humanity of Montgomery County Tennessee is a volunteer-driven organization. We depend on volunteers to help us with construction, office tasks, ReStore operations and on committees. Construction skills are not required. We also depend on individual donations and sponsorships to fund materials for our projects. To join us call (931) 645-4222 and together, we’ll build a better community.

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